Issue 2016.2

since 01. April 2016

C O N T E N T S   2.2016

 

 

 


ORIGINAL ARTICLES                                                                                                               


Kelati Awatef, Meziane Mariame, Mernissi Fatima Zahra
Blood eosinophilia: a poor prognostic factor for primary cutaneous T cell lymphomas? A cohort of 72 cases
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 131-135         DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.37

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 Thank you for the interesting manuscript. Major prognostic indicators for T-cell malignancies have been elucidated in many studies; high lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level, and eosinophilia are prognostic factors that have been identified by multivariate analysis. Additional factors associated with poor prognosis include thrombocytopenia, eosinophilia, bone marrow involvement, high interleukin-5 serum level. As with other T-cell malignancies and Hodgkin disease, CTCLs are frequently associated with eosinophilia. Eosinophilia has been related to the predominant secretion of T helper cell type 2 (TH2) eosinophilopoietic or eosinophilotactic cytokines (interleukin [IL] 3, IL-5, and sargramostim) by neoplastic cells. In patients with CTCL, the relevance of blood eosinophilia has been suggested in many studies. In a study titled “Prognostic Value of Blood Eosinophilia in Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas” The findings of univariable analysis of initial variables possibly influencing disease progression revealed significant prognostic value for diagnosis according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% CI, 1.04-7.41; P = .04), type of skin involvement (HR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.00-7.25; P = .04), raised blood eosinophil absolute count (HR, 7.33; 95% CI, 2.84-18.91; P<.001), and raised serum level of lactate dehydrogenase (HR, 3.72; 95% CI, 1.58-8.78; P = .001).Concerning disease-specific death, significant prognostic indicators were diagnosis according to the EORTC classification (HR, 6.62; 95% CI, 1.68-26.12; P = .007) and a raised blood eosinophil absolute count (HR, 10.57; 95% CI, 2.28-49.0; P<.001). In multivariable analysis, only blood eosinophilia was associated with disease progression and disease-specific death. Several studies investigating eosinophilia in Hodgkin disease too found a worse relapse-free survival rate in patients with eosinophilia than in those without. Tissue eosinophilia has been shown to be the strongest prognostic factor for poor relapse-free survival and overall survival in nodular sclerosing Hodgkin disease. In conclusion blood eosinophilia has good  association with disease progression and disease-specific death and could be indicated as a prognostic factor in patients with primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCLs).   Dr. Mohamed Wael Daboul (Syrian Arab Republic)  

Uwe Wollina, Beatrix Gaber, Rahaf Mansour, Dana Langner, Gesina Hansel, André Koch
Dermatologic Challenges of Health Care for Displaced People. Lessons from a German Emergency Refugee Camp
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 136-138          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.38

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 1) Governments vary on what restrictions they put on caring and prescribing for displaced persons but as referenced by Fuller et al 2013 in this article the carer  will always have United Nations backing. In Rome the legality of the recipient of care is always recorded, but after ticking the appropriate box, therapy can go ahead.   2) As described in this Dresden experience interpreters are needed. Sometimes they are required urgently and always communication and counselling is in itself therapeutic. It is therefore helpful to have one site allocated for volunteer interpreters so one does not have to waste time looking for them. It can also provide to the interpreter some guidance on confidentiality.   3)Whether it is an emergency  as described or at the site of a disaster such as an earthquake ,a single known site to accept  sort and distribute medicines and devises will help to avoid the chaotic availability of multiple donations, and assessment of their safety.   4) Ivermectin was prescribed for treatment of scabies affecting whole families. It is not normally prescribed for under fives and for the pregnant.   Prof. Terence J. Ryan (United Kingdom)  

 The paper did not question hygiene measurements at the camp. nor the environment at the camp itself, i.e. Laundry, bathrooms, toilets.  The paper should include a set of proposals and recommendations stating the need of dermatology service as a first mandatory health service before establishing a shelter for displaced people. What did they do with the patients infected with scabies, mycosis ….etc.   Dr. Samar Al-Nahhas (Liban)    

Christiane Koudoukpo, Félix Atadokpede, Laouali Salissou, Françoise Assogba, Fabrice Akpadjan, Bérénice Degboe, Nadège Agbessi, Hugues Adégbidi
Evaluation clinique du délai de cicatrisation des lésions d’ulcère de Buruli de diamètre inférieur ou égal à 10 centimètres à Pobè (Bénin)
[Clinical evaluation of the deadline of healing of the ulcer of Buruli hurts of diameter lower or equal to 10 centimeters in pobe (Benin)]
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 139-144          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.39

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Kalegowda Deepadarshan, Bugude Gangadhar, Mallaiah Mallikarjun
Cutaneous hypopigmentary disorders – An observational study
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 145-148          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.40

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Ayşe Akbaş, Fadime Kilinç, Halil Ibrahim Yakut, Ahmet Metin
Nail Disorders in Children, a clinical study
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 149-154          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.41

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Ashutosh Talwar, Neerja Puri
A study on scar revision
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 155-159          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.42

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BRIEF REPORTS                                                                                                                      


Lorenzo Martini, Alessandro Valle
Cross-linked natural gum resins, when inserted in shampooing product, result infallible to eliminate several metallic ions risky for hair keratin
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 160-164          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.43

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Lorenzo Martini
The diverse and amazing allergic responses to coloured semi-synthetic fabrics in skin of man, woman and transgenders (MTF and FTM)
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 165-168          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.44

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CASE REPORTS                                                                                                                       


María Lorena Re Domínguez, Rosalba Riveros, Tatiana Moreno, Beatriz María Di Martino Ortiz, Mirtha Rodríguez Masi, Oilda Knopfelmacher, Lourdes Bolla de Lezcano
Torus palatinus. Report of two cases
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 169-171         DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.45

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Uwe Wollina
Arsenic and skin cancer – case report with chemoprevention
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 172-175          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.46

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 Arsenic is a human carcinogen and is known to be accompanied by Bowen’s disease, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. In addition, association of arsenic poisoning and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) has also reported since Ohnishi et al. and we first reported in late 90’s [1,2]. Ohnishi et al. reported 81-year-old Japanese male and we reported 72-year-old Japanese male of MCC associated with Bowen’s disease who had histories of arsenic exposure. After that Taiwanese case series were followed [3,4]. If such a carcinoma is also prevented by retinoids, it would be desirable.   References:  1. Ohnishi Y, Murakami S, Ohtsuka H, Miyauchi S, Shinmori H, Hashimoto K. Merkel cell carcinoma and multiple Bowen’s disease: incidental association or possible relationship to inorganic arsenic exposure? J Dermatol 1997;24:310-6.  2. Tsuruta D, Hamada T, Mochida K, Nakagawa K, Kobayashi H, Ishii M. Merkel cell carcinoma, Bowen’s disease and chronic occupational arsenic poisoning. Br J Dermatol 1998;139:291-4.  3. Lien HC, Tsai TF, Lee YY, Hsiao CH. Merkel cell carcinoma and chronic arsenicism. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999;41:641-3.  4. Ho SY, Tsai YC, Lee MC, Guo HR. Merkel cell carcinoma in patients with long-term ingestion of arsenic. J Occup Health. 2005;47:188-92.   Daisuke Tsuruta, MD, PhD (Japan)  

Khalifa E. Sharquie, Adil A. Noaimi
Follicular vitiligo: The present clinical status
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 176-178          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.47

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Manuel Valdebran, Karen N Wu, Andrew Wu, Jacqueline M Junkins-Hopkins
Polypoid melanoma: a rare clinical subtype frequently confused with benign entities
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 179-180          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.48

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Ayşe Akbaş, Fadime Kilinç, Sertaç Şener, Nuran Süngü, Aydan Kilinçaslan, Ahmet Metin
Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma: A case report
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 181-184          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.49

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Mehmet Eren Yuksel, Funda Tamer
Sebaceous carcinoma of the forehead: Case report
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 185-187         DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.50

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Rafael Corredor-Osorio, Moravia Suarez-Tata, María Eugenia Orellana
Pilomatricoma of the Orbit
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 188-190          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.51

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 Thank you for this well explained case report of a Pilomatricoma found in an unusual site like the orbit. In my opinion, it would be also interesting to understand why it was performed a computed tomography  as first imaging examination; I think that ultrasound  could represent an alternative choice in this case with optimal results.   Dr Francesco Maria Solivetti (Italy) Dr. Francesco Maria Solivetti thank you for reading our article "fibrolipoma of the orbit", and in order to answer your comment, let me indicate that the pattient came to our clinic asking evaluation due that he was with orbit tumor. In this first evaluation, the patient showed a computed tomography of the orbit that he had taken previosly. So, we decided there was no necessary to make another image diagnosis. Certainly, we agreed with you that the ultrasonography is an important alternative for better diagnosis    Dr. Rafael Corredor-Osorio 

María Lorena Re Domínguez, Beatriz Di Martino Ortiz, Mirtha Rodríguez Masi, Oilda Knopfelmacher Domínguez, Lourdes Bolla Argüello de Lezcano
Dermatoporosis, an emerging disease. Case report
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 191-194          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.52

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 With the increase in lifespan, we are now facing a functional, rather than cosmetic, dimension of skin aging, where the protective mechanical functions of the skin are lost. Dermatoporosis is a novel term proposed to describe the chronic cutaneous insufficiency/fragility syndrome characterized by an extreme skin atrophy [1,2]. Dermatoporosis is principally due to chronological aging and long-term and unprotected sun exposure, but it may also result from the chronic use of topical and systemic corticosteroids [3]. Besides skin lacerations and ulcerations, deep dissecting hematoma (DDH) is an emerging severe complication of dermatoporosis [4]. Secondary to a minor traumatic event, rupture of the fragile dermatoporotic skin vessels exposed to skin surface due to epidermal and dermal atrophy and to the loss of viscoelasticity seems to be the pathogenetic mechanism underlying this complication. Prompt diagnosis by clinical examination and radiologic imaging, and immediate surgical evacuation of the hematoma and the necrotic tissue are critical to save the life of the patient [4-6]. In this issue, Re Domínguez et al. report another case of DDH as a complication of stage IV dermatoporosis and underline the importance of the awareness of this emerging syndrome by health care professionnals, especially by dermatologists and geriatricians [7].   We have recently proposed a membrane organelle, hyalurosome, composed of molecules involved in hyaluronate (HA) metabolism and cell signaling in the keratinocytes, such as principal HA receptor CD44, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), HB-EGF receptor erbB1 and HA synthase 3 (HAS3), which is functionally defective in dermatoporosis and may be a target for intervention [8]. Several lines of evidence suggest that hyalurosome is located in keratinocyte filopodia, thin, actin-rich plasma membrane protrusions implicated in cell motility. We have recently shown that keratinocyte filopodia are downregulated by corticosteroids in vitro [8]. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms implicating hyalurosome seems to be crucial to better understand the pathogenesis of dermatoporosis and to develop new therapeutic and preventive strategies [9-12].     References:   1. Kaya G, Saurat JH. Dermatoporosis – A chronic cutaneous insufficiency/fragility syndrome: Clinico-pathological features, mechanisms, prevention and potential treatments.  Dermatology. 2007;215:284-94.  2. Saurat JH. Dermatoporosis. The functional side of skin aging. Dermatology. 2007 ;215:271-2.  3. Kaya G, Saurat JH. Dermatoporosis: A new concept in skin aging. Eur Ger Med. 2010;1: 216-9.  4. Kaya G, Jacobs F, Prins C, Viero D, Kaya A, Saurat JH. Deep dissecting hematoma: An emerging severe complication of dermatoporosis. Arch Dermatol. 2008;144:1303-8. 5. Toutous Trellu L, Weiss L, Tarteaut MH, Kaya A, Cheretakis A, Kaya G. Deep dissecting hematoma: A plaidoyer for an early and specialized management. Eur Ger Med. 2010;1:228-30.  6. Toutous Trellu L, Herrmann FR, Tarteaut MH, Kaya A, Cheretakis A, Kaya G. Post-traumatic cutaneous hematomas in geriatrics hospital: A neglected disease? Eur Ger Med. 2012;3:107-111.  7. Re Domínguez ML, Di Martino Ortiz B, Rodríguez Masi M, Knopfelmacher Domínguez O, Bolla de Lezcano L. Dermatoporosis, an emerging disease: case report. Our Dermatol Online 2016;7:191-4.  8. Barnes L, Ino F, Jaunin F, Saurat JH, Kaya G. Inhibition of putative hyalurosome platform in keratinocytes as a mechanism for corticosteroid-induced epidermal atrophy. J Invest Dermatol. 2013;133:1017-26.  9. Kaya G, Tran C, Sorg O, Hotz R, Grand D, Carraux P, et al. Hyaluronate fragments reverse skin atrophy by a CD44-dependent mechanism. PLoS Med. 2006;3:e493.  10. Kaya G. New therapeutic targets in dermatoporosis. J Nutr Health Aging. 2012;16:220-34.  11. Darbellay B, Barnes L, Boehncke WH, Saurat JH, Kaya G. Reversal of murine epidermal atrophy by topical modulation of calcium signaling. J Invest Dermatol. 2014;134:1599-608.  12. Nikolic DS, Ziori C, Kostaki M, Fontao L, Saurat JH, Kaya G. Hyalurosome gene regulation and dose-dependent restoration of skin atrophy by retinaldehyde and defined-size hyaluronate fragments in dermatoporosis. Dermatology. 2014;229:110-5.   Prof Gürkan Kaya (Switzerland)  

Daifullah Al Aboud
Bullous reaction to a Mantoux test; a case report and review of the literature
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 195-197          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.53

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Salim Al Gaadi, Sarah Al Godayan, Iqbal Bukhari
Lipedematous scalp: Case report and review of the literature
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 198-200          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.54

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Manel Yahia, Besma Laabidi, Issam M’sakni, Fethi Bougrine, Ammar Bouziani
Lafora disease: A case report
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 201-203          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.55

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Selma Emre, Ahmet Metin, Nuran Sungu, Fadime Kilinc, Duriye Deniz Demirseren
Linear atrophoderma of Moulin located on the face
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 204-206          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.56

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Masataka Satoh, Hideko Okabe, Reiko Orikasa, Toshiyuki Yamamoto
Henoch-Schönlein purpura (IgA vasculitis) developing after postoperative wound infection by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 207-209          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.57

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 In the recent case report published by Satoh and colleagues, another case of Staphylococcus aureus associated Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) is described in an adult patient after sternotomy wound infection. Like the case reported by us, this patient also developed presumed renal involvement with increased serum creatinine as well as nephrotic range proteinuria. This case is important to the literature because it continues to highlight the necessary addition of HSP to the differential diagnosis of adult patients with lower extremity purpura. Classically taught as a disease of childhood, increasing numbers of cases of adult patients have been published in recent years. Close communication between Rheumatology and Dermatology specialists is necessary to ensure that direct immunoflourescense is obtained on skin biopsy specimens suspicious of vasculitis. This is especially important after a recent infection and in community hospital settings where it may not be routinely done. As the literature on this subject grows, Staphylococcus aureus appears to be playing a larger role in HSP, and may be important to the pathogenesis of worsening renal outcomes in adult patients.   Thank you for this interesting addition to the medical literature.  Reference:  1. Berquist JB, Bartels CM. Rare association of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura with recurrent endocarditis. WMJ. 2011;110:38-40.   Dr Jilaine Bolek Berquist (USA)  

Kalegowda Deepadarshan, Bugude Gangadhar, Mallaiah Mallikarjun
Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a rare case report
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 210-212          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.58

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REVIEW ARTICLES                                                                                                                  


Éva Zitás, Judit Mészáros
The most common childhood skin diseases
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 213-218          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.59

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Mateusz P. Kister, Katarzyna Borowska, Barbara Jodłowska-Jędrych, Karolina A. Kister, Bartłomiej Drop
The potential role of cell phones in dissemination of bacteria in a healthcare setting
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 219-224          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.60

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Zonunsanga
Signalling pathways in dermatology
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 225-228          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.61

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CLINICAL IMAGE                                                                                                                     


Zoran Vrucinic, Dragana Starovic
Dermatitis herpetiformis Duhring
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 229          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.62

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR                                                                                                    


David Terrero, Manuel Valdebran, Ruzeng Xue
Long-standing asymptomatic pretibial patch
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 230-231          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.63

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Gökçe Işil Kurmuş, Müzeyyen Gönül, Ahmet Tuirul Su, Nesrin Gürçay, Murat Alper
Palmar involvement in lichen planus
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 232-233          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.64

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Patricia Chang, Génesis Argueta
Pincer nail
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 234-237          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.65

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Manuel Valdebran, Amira Elbendary, Zachary Kolansky, Ritu Sainai, Elen Blochin
Desmoplastic trichilemoma of the scalp
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 238-239          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.66

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Abhineetha Hosthota, Swapna Bondade, Divya Monnappa, Vinay Basavaraja
Penodynia and Depression
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 240-241          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.67

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 I have read with great interest the letter entitled “ Penodynia and depression” by Hosthota et al recently published.  The two-way connection between depression and pain has been known clinically since long. 1. Pains are common features of depression and depression frequently sets in when individuals are battling persistent pain. Therefore, proving that penodynia in the case was a result of depression could not concluded because the temporal association could never be proved after 8 months of the symptom appearance. That is to say we could never be sure that the patient developed penodynia first and subsequently developed depression, or penodynia is a physical symptom of his depressive illness. Let mention the history lacks details about such type of pain and whether it prevented the patient from sexual intercourse during the last 8 months duration or not. Moreover, pain could be a type of somatoform disorders. Persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD) is the commonest somatoform disorder with patients with chronic pain without organic pathology. 2. Therefore, a summary of diagnostic criteria on which depression was diagnosed lacks here in the presented case as to rule out the other criteria for somatization. Moreover, mono-symptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis is known since almost 30 years and psychotic depression should be ruled out.   References:  1. Boakye PA, Olechowski C, Rashiq S, Verrier MJ, Kerr B, Witmans M, et al. A Critical Review of Neurobiological Factors Involved in the Interactions Between Chronic Pain, Depression, and Sleep Disruption. Clin J Pain. 2016;32:327-36.  2. Mohan I, Lawson-Smith C, Coall DA, Van der Watt G, Janca A. Somatoform disorders in patients with chronic pain. Australas Psychiatry. 2014;22:66-70.  3. Gournellis R, Oulis P, Rizos E, Chourdaki E, Gouzaris A, Lykouras L. Clinical correlates of age of onset in psychotic depression. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2011;52:94-8.  4. Munro A. Monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 1988;:37-40.   Mustafa Afifi, MD (United Arab Emirates)  


HISTORICAL ARTICLE                                                                                                            


Nora Mohammed Al-Aboud
Scientific medical societies for hair; an Overview
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 242-243          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.68

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Piotr Brzeziński, Patricia Chang, Ru-Ying Fan, Vijay Krishnan, Wilfred CG Peh, Pierre Francès, Fereydoun Davatchi, Anca Chiriac
Dermatology Eponyms – sign –Lexicon (P). Part 1
      Our Dermatol Online 2016; 7(2): 244-252          DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20162.69

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